UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women: 2021 Call for Proposals

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Deadline: 6 January 2022

United Nations (UN) is offering a wide range of opportunities/grant calls to address sustainable development challenges worldwide. Here is a list of these opportunities you can apply this month.

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UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women: 2021 Call for Proposals

The 25th grant cycle of the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women (UN Trust Fund) is now open. This fund is seeking proposals for civil society-led, demand-driven initiatives to end violence against marginalized women and girls and those experiencing intersecting forms of discrimination.

The UN Trust Fund will prioritize applications that employ an intersectional approach and adopt the principle of leaving no one behind in working with the most marginalized women and girls (including, but not limited to, indigenous women and girls, minority ethnic women and girls, LBTIQ+ people, women and girls with disabilities, older women, women and girls internally displaced (IDPs) and refugees, and women and girl survivors of violence).

The UN Trust Fund prioritizes applications from women’s rights organizations and local civil society organizations led by and for marginalized women and girls; organizations that are the driving force of the ending violence against women and girls agenda in their communities and those at the forefront of reaching at-risk women and girls and survivors of violence are invited to apply for a grant.

This Call for Proposal is guided by the UN Trust Fund’s Strategic Plan 2021-25 and its vision of “a world of global solidarity in which all women and girls live free from all forms of violence and enjoy and exercise their human rights. This vision is aligned with international human rights standards, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (SDGs) and international humanitarian principles and standards, of which gender equality and the elimination of all forms of violence and discrimination against women and girls is an integral part.

The aim of the UN Trust Fund, over the next five years, is to “ensure that more women and girls, especially the most marginalized and those experiencing intersecting forms of discrimination, can exercise their human right to live a life free of all forms of violence” through initiatives that:

  • Improve prevention of VAW/G through changes in behaviours, practices and attitudes
  • Improve access for women and girls to essential, specialist, safe and adequate multisectoral services.
  • Increase effectiveness of legislation, policies, national action plans and accountability systems to prevent and end VAW/G

In pursuit of these outcomes, the UN Trust Fund’s mission is to “enable Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), especially Women’s Rights Organizations (WROs) and those that represent the most marginalized groups, to play a central role in delivering survivor-centered and demand-driven initiatives and to support their programmes to achieve sustainable impact on ending violence against women and girls (EVAW/G) in a manner that contributes to global solidarity, partnerships, and inclusive feminist movements”.

The Call for Proposals

In this context, the UN Trust Fund welcomes proposals:

  1. Submitted by organizations with proven expertise in ending violence against women and girls (VAW/G)
  2. Conceptualized, developed and fully implemented by CSOs, in line with their assessments of the particular needs of their countries or communities and aligned to one or more of the UN Trust Fund’s three outcome areas
  3. Focused on marginalized women and girls, and those experiencing intersecting forms of discrimination
  4. Guided by the UN Trust Fund’s values and principles, with special attention to:
    • adopting an intersectional approach and in line with the “leave no one behind” principle
    • organizational resilience and sustainability in a rapidly changing and complex environment

1. Organizations with proven EVAW/G expertise

The UN Trust Fund only accept applications from organizations with specialized knowledge, expertise, and a track record of working on women’s rights and prevention and/or elimination of violence against women and girls.

For this Call, they will prioritize applications from the following types of organizations:

  1. Women’s rights organizations (WROs), in full recognition of their being the driving force of the ending violence against women agenda and feminist movements, as well as being at the forefront of EVAW/G work, directly reaching women and girls survivors.
  2. CSOs/WROs led by and for marginalized women and girls (e.g. constituent-led), that have specialized knowledge, expertise and a proven track record of working with women and girls facing or at risk of violence. Girl-led and girl-centered organizations are particularly encouraged to apply.
  3. CSOs/WROs with local or community-level reach that are best-placed to meet the needs of women and girls in their contexts, including through collaboration and equitable partnerships. Applications from organizations that are not local (but meet other criteria) are still welcome if the proposal includes an equitable partnership with, for example, local women’s rights organizations or constituent led groups for greater impact or community reach. The proposal must demonstrate how the partnership will ensure an equitable power balance that empowers community/locally based CSOs/WROs.

2. Projects conceptualized, developed and fully implemented by CSOs

The UN Trust Fund is committed to demand-driven grant-giving which means proposals are welcome for projects that are conceptualized, developed, and fully implemented by CSOs in accordance with their own assessment of the particular needs of their countries and communities, taking into account national priorities. A demand-driven approach is also in line with the UN principles of supporting national ownership and in the spirit of the Paris Declaration and Accra Agenda for Action commitments on aid effectiveness. As described under UN Women’s EVAW programming principles (see Section 8), demand-driven also implies that project design employs culturally and contextually relevant entry points, informed by, for example, community and relevant needs assessments. Proposals are therefore expected to include a thorough needs analysis of the most marginalized women and girls, or those experiencing intersecting forms of violence, preferably informed and/or led by the constituents themselves.

Under this broad framework, the UN Trust Fund welcomes proposals for initiatives that contribute to one or more of its three strategic outcome areas (see Section 2 above). Specific intervention types have deliberately not been listed to allow proposals to be truly demand driven. However, UN Women’s EVAW/G Programming Principles have been listed in Section 8 along with useful resources in Section 12. Applicants should also be guided by global research and available evidence as well as practice-based knowledge and ensure that applications are backed up with a justification based on these insights and evidence.

3. Focused on marginalized women and girls and those experiencing intersecting forms of discrimination

Proposals should be focused on particularly marginalized women and girls and those experiencing intersecting forms of discrimination, in the targeted context or community. For example, women and girl survivors of violence, women and girls with disabilities, women and girl IDPs and refugees, women and girls living with HIV and/or AIDS, indigenous women and girls, minority ethic women and girls , lesbians, bisexual and transgender women and girls, women and girls experiencing racial discrimination and/or injustice, women human rights defenders / gender advocates and/or women and girls in the lowest-income groups. This list is not exhaustive, and the focus of proposal should ideally be determined by context, community and needs analysis. They welcome proposals which take an intersectional approach, taking into account the ways in which intersecting identities can lead to increased risks and compound vulnerabilities.

4. Guided by the UN Trust Fund’s values and principles

The UN Trust Fund operates under the UN Programming Principles, centered on the principle to leave no one behind, as well as UN Women’s EVAW programming principles on EVAW/G . The full set of core values and principles can be found in the UN Trust Fund’s Strategic Plan, pages 35-37. In consideration of the primary focus of this Call for Proposals (on the most marginalized women and girls) applicants are asked to pay specific attention to:

  • Adopting an intersectional approach to designing interventions to end VAW/G
  • Ensuring organizational resilience and sustainability in a rapidly changing and complex environment

“An intersectional approach to violence against women and girls [VAW/G] includes a consideration of where gender intersects with other inequalities/oppressions (sexuality, gender identity, ethnicity, indigeneity, immigration status, disability, poverty, illiteracy) to produce unique experiences of violence. By understanding the different ways in which violence is perpetrated and experienced, an intersectional lens can help organizations develop appropriate context-specific responses when addressing VAW/G.”

Putting an intersectional approach into practice means going beyond analysis to disrupt the structures, systems and power relations that create and reinforce the inequalities that maintain women’s and girls’ compounded vulnerabilities to violence (e.g. transforming social norms, addressing discriminatory structures). It requires transforming underlying socio-structural systems to address root causes that currently make some women and girls more vulnerable to violence.

Ensuring organizational resilience and sustainability in a rapidly changing and complex environment is crucial in order to ensure sustained transformational change and facilitate quick adaptation and recovery from challenging situations. Strengthening resilience could include for example, ongoing monitoring and risk assessment, developing risk mitigation plans and contingency measures factored into project design, adaptative and flexible programming methodologies (i.e. moving online, alternative arrangements for access and inclusivity in crisis situations), integration of measures to prevent backlash and resistance, partnerships with other CSOs/WROs to maintain community reach even through crises, measures to ensure sustainability of project results, and enhanced efforts to ensure organizational capacity.

Funding Information

They will fund all selected organizations for a three-year period. In doing so, they intend to ensure predictability of funding and technical assistance for organizations they select, and continuity of services for the women and girls they reach.

They will award grants between US $50,000 and US $150,000 for small civil society organizations. To be considered a “small organization”, the organization’s annual operational budget must have been lower than US$ 200,000 (on average) over the last three years.

They will award grants between US $150,001 and US $1,000,000 for all other civil society organizations.

Organizations should consider their own operational and absorptive capacity when submitting a funding request. In general, an organization cannot request a grant amount more than thrice its annual organization budget (using last 3-years average organizational budget). They will assess absorptive capacity against financial and audit reports as well as annual organization budget information submitted as part of the application.

Eligibility Criteria

Priority organizations that meet the following criteria are eligible to apply:

  • Country coverage
    • The applicant must implement a project in only one of the countries and/or territories listed in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Assistance Committee’s (OECD DAC) list of official development assistance (ODA) recipients.
  • Legal status and registration
    • The applicant must be a legally registered entity. Either the main applicant or at least one of its co-implementing partner(s) must be legally registered in the country or territory of project implementation. They require that legal registration documents be submitted with the application.
  • Demonstrated capacity for operational, financial and human resource management
    • Operational and human resources: The applicant must have the necessary operational and human resources to manage the proposed project. A clear project control framework should be defined once implementation starts.
    • Certified Financial Statements and Organizational Audit Reports: The applicant must submit certified financial statements and organizational audit reports for three fiscal years (including 2018, 2019 and 2020).
    • Partnership and accountability arrangements: Organizations can only apply once under this Call for Proposals, either as the main applicant organization or as a co-implementing partner.
      • An application should include no more than three co-implementing partners that will receive a portion of the requested funding.
      • In all cases, the applicant organization will be accountable for managing the grant award in its entirety.
      • If applicable, the applicant organization will also be responsible for ensuring that its co-implementing partners fully understand and comply with all the requirements and obligations of the grant process.
      • If awarded a grant, the applicant organization will also be responsible and liable for its co-implementing partner’s performance and results delivery.
      • They highly encourage the use of Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) among all partners to define roles, responsibilities, deliverables and lines of accountability.

Ineligible Applicants

The following are NOT eligible to apply for a grant:

  • Organizations proposing interventions in a country not listed in the OECD DAC list of ODA recipients
  • Organizations proposing interventions in more than one country or territory
  • Organizations whose work and mission/vision statement do not focus on nor explicitly mention gender equality and the elimination of violence against women and/or girls
  • Organizations that do not have a legal status in the country or territory of implementation, and neither do any of its co-implementing partners
  • Government agencies or institutions
  • UN agencies or UN Country Teams
  • Private individuals
  • Private sector entities
  • Organizations currently implementing a UN Trust Fund grant (unless it ends before March 2022)

 

For more information, visit UN Trust Fund.

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